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LIST OF PESTICIDES CURRENTLY APPROVED FOR USE ON COCOA FARMS IN NIGERIA BY THE COCOA RESEARCH INSTITUTE OF NIGERIA (CRIN)

 REVIEW OF PRICES OF CRIN PRODUCE/PRODUCTS AND SERVICES

 A.                  Agricultural Produce

 

S/NO.

PRODUCE

PRICES

1.

Cocoa Seedlings

 

(a)    WACRI

(b)   F3 Amazon

(c)    Hybrid-open Pollination

(d)   Hybrid-Hand Pollinated

(e)   Budded

 

 

100.00/Seedlings

120.00/Seedlings

150.00/Seedlings

200.00/Seedlings

500.00/Seedlings

2

Cocoa Pods:

 

(a)                WACRI

 

(b)               F3 Amazon

 

(c)                Hybrid

 

(d)               Hybrid Open Pollinated

 

100.00/pod

 

150.00/pod

 

300.00/pod

 

 

200.00/pod

 

3

 

Kolanut

 

 

Prevailing market

Price/Basket

 

4.

Kola Seedling

 

120.00/Seedlings

5.

Cashew nut seeds

(a)    Medium

(b)   Jumbo

 

800.00/kg

1,500.00/kg

6.

Cashew Seedlings

(a)    Medium

(b)   Jumbo

 

120.00/seedling

150.00/seedling

7

Cashew Apple

 

10.00/Apple

8.

Coffee Seedling

(a)    Robusta

(b)   Arabica

120.00/Seedlings

150.00/Seedlings

9.

Coffee Berry (undepulped &  dried)

 

150.00/kg

10.

Tea Seedlings

 

120.00/Seedlings

11.

Plantain Sucker

(a)    Miniset

(b)   Volunteer

 

  50.00/Sucker

100.00/Sucker

12.

Plantain Bunch (Large)

Plantain per kg

600.00

13.

Banana Bunch

 

200/bunch

14.

Vegetable:

(a)    Rainy Season

(b)   Dry Season

 

50.00/pack

100.00/pack

15.

Flower

100.00/one

16.

Pineapple

150.00 minimum

200.00 large

 

17.

Pawpaw

50.00/one

18.

Okra

50.00/pack

19.

Pepper

50.00/pack or prevailing market price

20.

 

Tomatoes

Prevailing market price

21

Mango:

(a)    Retail

(b)   Bulk

 

10.00/one

1,000/tree

22

Cassava:

(a)    Tuber

(b)   Stem

 

1,200.00/kg(50kg/bag)

15,000/200 heaps

 250.00/pack

 

23

Maize Cob (Fresh & Dried)

Prevailing market price

24

Palm Fruit

400.00/Bunch

 

25

Palm Oil

Prevailing Market Price

26

Agbalumo

4,000.00 – 5,000.0/Tree

27

Ogbono

5,000.00/Tree

28

Awin

300.00/Tree

29

Cocoa Pod Husk Fresh

Cocoa Pod Husk Dry

100/kg

200/kg

30

Cocoa Pod Ash Dry

1000/kg

31

Firewood

Lorry Load

Tractor

Pick-up

Pack

Staff

Outsider

6,000

3,000

2,000

100

8,000

5,000

3,000

150

32

Dried Cocoa beans 

 

Prevailing market price for access

 

33

Mistletoes (fresh)

 

500.00/bagco bag

39

African  Star Apple seedling

 

200.00/seedling

40.

Rose Apple Seedling

 

250.00/Seedling

 


   B.                  ACCESS FEES/LOAD FOR TIMBER & FIREWOOD HAULAGE

 

NOS

 

          PRODUCTS

PRICE

 

a.

b.

c.

d.

       

          Tractor

        

           Lorry

        

          Hiace

         Pick Up

1,500.00

2,500.00

1,000.00

1,000.00

 

C.   
      RODUCTS OF AGRIC. SERVICES AND BY-PRODUCTS LTD.

S/NO.

 

PRODUCTS

PRICES

1.

Chocolate

 

50.00/bar

2.

Cocoa  Bread:

(a)    Small loaf

(b)   Big Loaf

 

100.00/loaf

200.00/loaf

3.

Wines

 

600.00/bottle

4.

Roasted Cashew Nuts:

(a)    White Kernel  Bottle (200gm)

(b)   Honey coated kernel bottle. 200gm

(c)    White Kernel pack (100gm)

(d)   Honey coated kernel pack (100gm)

 

 

250.00/bottle

300.00/bottle

100.00/pack

120.00/pack

5.

Green Tea (200g)

300.00/pack

6.

Cashew Juice (35cl)

150/bottle

7.

CRIN Vita

300.00/pack

8.

Cocoa Custard

300.00/pack

9.

Cocoa-kola beverage

300.00/pack

10.

Soy choco

100.00/bottle

11.

Liquid Detergent

300.00/litre

12.

Body Cream

250.00/pack

13.

Hair Cream

250.00/pack

14.

Black Soap (bar)

100.00/pack

D.      COCOA BUYERS REGISTRATION FEE

 


S/N0.

REGISTRAION

        FEES

             (N)

1.

Initial Registration for new buyers

10,000.00

2.

Cocoa buyers Annual Renewal of Registration

  5,000.00

  E.        

 SOILS AND BIOLOGICAL SERVICES

 

S/N0.

ITEM

NEW RATE

COST

1

Soil analysis

7,000

 

2

Soil Sample Processing

150.00

 

3

Plant Sample Analysis

6,000

 

4

Plant Sample Processing

150.00

 

5

Size Validation of Farm

10,000

 

6

Administration  Charge

 

25% of Total Cost

7.

Plant identification

 

300/specimen

8.

Insect identification

 

400-500/specimen (depending on level of identification)

9.

Sale of insects

 

100.00/specimen

 

E.                                           AGROCHEMICAL SCREENING

 (i)                 INSECTICIDE & FUNGICIDE SCREENING

 

S/NO.

ITEMS

COST

1.

Product analysis

187,500

2.

Laboratory screening

437,500

3.

First year field trial

625,000

4.

Second year field trial

625,000

5.

Third year field trial

750,000

6.

Residue analysis

To be borne by the company

7.

Institution Administration and logistics fee

500,000

8.

Hazard allowance /honorarium for Researcher (10% of total cost)

375,000

 

 

 

 


 (ii)               HERBICIDE SCREENING

 

S/N0.

Services

Rate (N)

     1.

 Products analysis

187,500

2.

 Laboratory Screening

437,500

3.

 First year field trial

625,000

4.

 Second year field trial

625,000

5.

Third year field trial

750,000

5.

 Residue analysis

To be borne by the company

6.

 Institution/logistic charges

500,000

7.

 Hazard allowance/honorarium for researcher (10% of total)

375,000

 

(iii)

 TESTING OF SPRAYERS

 

S/N0.

Services

Rate (N)

1

Trombone sprayer

150,000.00  + 3 testing samples

2

Manual knapsack sprayer

250,000.00  + 3 testing samples

3

Motorized knapsack sprayer

350,000.00  + 3 testing samples

 G.

          REST HOUSE ACCOMMODATION

S/N0.

Services

Rate (N)

1.

Single Room/Night  (For Staff)

2,000

2.

Single Room/Night (Non Staff)

3,000

2.

Chalet/Night (for Staff)

4,000

4.

Chalet/Night (Non Staff)

5,000

       

 

H.                                              TRANSPORT SERVICES

(i)    VEHICLE FROM IBADAN TO DIFFERENT LOCATIONS

 

S/N0.

Services

Rate (N)

1.

Coaster bus 100 km

15,000

 

Cost/km

150.00

2

Hilux /Hummer Bus 100km

10,000

 

Cost/km

100

3.

Lorry 100km

20,250

 

Cost/Km

202.5

 Note:   Additional day attracts 50% of the charge

Cost of fueling and drivers allowance shall be borne by the application.

   (ii).

 AMBULANCE

 

S/N0.

SERVICES

 

RATE (N)

1.

From home to mortuary within Ibadan

10,000.00

2.

From mortuary to cemetery within Ibadan city

10,000.00

3.

Trip outside Ibadan city (within 150 km radius)

30,000.00

4.

Trip outside Ibadan city (for every extra 100 km beyond the initial 150 km)

10,000.00

 

 I.

METEOROLOGICAL DATA

 

S/N0.

Parameter (Data)

Rate (N)

1

1 year/ Parameter

200.00

2

6 months/Parameter

100.00

3

3 months/Parameter

100.00

4

1 months/Parameter

100.00

 


J.                                                                               HEALTH CENTRE SERVICES

 

S/NO.

 SERVICES

 

FEES (N)

1.

Antenatal Booking  (for Staff)

1000

2.

Antenatal Booking (Non Staff)

2000

3.

Delivery Fee for Staff

2000

4.

Delivery fee for Non Staff

5000

5.

Suturing of wound

1000

6.

Suturing of wound for Non Staff

 

7.

Admission of Staff

1000

8.

Admission for Non Staff

1500

9.

Card for Staff

  -

10.

Card for Non Staff

100

11.

Consultancy fee for Staff

  -

12.

Consultancy Fee for Non Staff

200

13.

Injection for Staff

 100

14.

Injection for Non Staff

100

15.

Drip for Staff

Replacement of drip materials only

16.

Drip for Non Staff

500 + replacement of drip materials

 K.

 ENVIRONMENAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT ON COCOA SOIL AND PLANT SAMPLES

 

S/N0.

SERVICES

 

RATE (N)

1

Elementary composition of product

7,312.50

2

Laboratory incubation study

237,600

3

First year field trial

649,125

4.

Second year field trial

703,175

5.

Third year field trial

744,906.25

6.

Cocoa pod husk and bean analysis

187,500

7.

Institute administration and logistic fees

500,000

8.

Hazard allowance/honorarium for Researcher (10% of total cost)

302,961.88

 L.

 LiBRARY SERVICES

 

S/N0.

SERVICES

 

RATE (N)

1

Cocoa Hybrid Book

2,000

2

Annual Report

1,500

3

Cocoa Survey

1000

4.

Occasional Publication on Mandate crops 

1000

5.

Photocopying per copy

5.00

6.

Information Booklet

2,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

User Rating: 0 / 5

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Dr. Lawrence Opeke
Director
1964-1974
Mr. Ayoade S. Adeyemi
Director
1974-1979
 
Dr. Samuel T. Olatoye
Director
1979 -1994
 
Dr. Jacob A. Williams
Director
1994 - 1998
 
Dr. Ayoola Fashina
Director
1998 - 2002
 
Prof Iremiren O. Gerald
Executive Director
2003 - 2011
 
Prof. Malachy  O. Akoroda
Executive Director
July 2012 - Dec. 2015
 

Dr(Mrs) F.A. Okelana
Acting Executive Director
Dec. 2015 - Sept. 2016

 

 

Year 2016 Seminar Presentations

Soil Fertility Assessment of some Cocoa Plantations in Five local Government Areas of Cross River State, Nigeria

Ibiremo, O. S., Iloyanomon, C.I1.,Oloyede, A.A.2  and  Lawal,  J.O.3

1Soils and Plant Nutrition section, Cocoa Research Institute of Nigeria, Ibadan, Nigeria.
2Agronomy section, Cocoa Research Institute ofNigeria, Ibadan, Nigeria
3Economic and statistic section, Cocoa Research Institute of Nigeria, Ibadan, Nigeria



 
Abstract
Ten cocoa farms with declining productivity in five Local Government Areas (LGAs) of Cross River State were selected for rehabilitation activities. The LGAs were Akpamkpa, Ikom, Etung, Boki and Obudu of which Yaunde (Ikom), Agbokim  waterfall (Etung) and Orimekpang (Boki) which are high cocoa producing areas, while Begiaba (Obudu) and New Ndebiji (Akamkpa) are medium cocoa producing areas.  Each farm was divided into four blocks with eight sampling points and soil samples were collected at soildepths of 0-15cm, 15-30cm and 30-45cm. Similarly, leaf samples were taken from the tree under whose canopy the soil samples were taken. The soil and leaf samples were processed and analyzed for some oftheir nutrient contents using standard laboratory procedures. Results indicated that soils of New Ndebiji and Orimekpang contained 0.65 and 0.71gkg-1 soil total N. These values are below the critical value for cocoa production. Hence, nitrogen fertilizer will be necessary in these two farms. Similarly, potassium and phosphorus were deficient in all the cocoa farms evaluated in the five LGAs. However, soil pH,organic carbon, base saturation and CEC fell within the acceptable range for cocoa production. Leaf N, P and K followed the trend of soil results. The fertilizer computation based on the nutrient composition of the soils indicated that Begiaba (Obudu) farm will require 41kg P2O5/ha  and 188kg K2O/ha with no nitrogen fertilizer,  New Ndebiji (Akampka) farm will need 23kgN/ha, 27kgP2O5 and211 K2O/, Agbokim-waterfall (Etung) will require 41kg P2O5/ha and 188kg, Yaunde (Ikom) 94kg P2O5/ha and 272kg K2O/ha, while Orimepang (Boki) requires 18kgN/ha, 23kgP2O5 and 13 K2O/ha. Non-acid forming fertilizers particularly organic based will be appropriate to achieve optimum productivity.
Keywords: Cocoa, soil fertility, Cross River State, productivity, fertilizer

 

EFFECTS OF NEMATODE MANAGEMENT OPTIONS IN THE REHABILITATION OF MORIBUND COCOA (Theobroma cacao L.) FARMS IN SOUTH WESTERN NIGERIA

By
Okeniyi, Michael O.

ABSTRACT
Losses due to nematodes are often difficult to assess, since small reduction in yield may pass unnoticed. Yields are commonly reduced by up to 30% per year. The study was carried out to evaluate the effects of nematode management options in the rehabilitation of two moribund cacao plantations at Owena and Ibadan using organic materials that included Cocoa Pod Husk (CPH) and Neem Leaf powder (NL). Initial soil sampling was done to determine the types, frequency of occurrence and population levels of plant-parasitic and other nematodes associated with old cacao plantation at the two locations. The experiment was laid out in a Randomized Complete Block Design in four replicates with eight treatments which were CPH, CPH+NL(80:20), CPH+NL(90:10), CPH+Carbofuran (C), CPH+NL(80:20)+C, CPH+NL(90:10)+C, Carbofuran only and untreated. Soil samples were taken at 25 cm depth and assayed for nematode using tray modification of the Baermann technique. Soil samples were collected and analyzed for nutrients at 4, 8, 12, 16 and 20 months after treatment applications. Cost benefit analysis for profitability was done using fixed and variable cost. The data were subjected to Analysis of Variance at P<0.05, means were separated using Least Significant Difference using SAS 9.3 Edition. Results showed that Nematodes genera identified in Ibadan were Meloidogyne, Pratylenchus, Helicotylenchus, Paralongidorus, Eutylenchus, Scutellonema, Hemicyclophora, Xiphinema, Longidorus, and Anguillulina. The most widely occurring was Meloidogyne spp with the frequency of 67%, followed by Anguillulina spp. (50%) and Paralongidorus spp. (33%). Three additional nematode genera identified in Owena were, Psilenchus, Tetylenchus and Heterodera. Meloidognye spp. was most predominant in Owena soil with a frequency of 75%, followed by Hemicycliophora  and Eutylenchus  with a frequency of 33 and 25% respectively. Organic amendments significantly (p<0.05) reduced the population of parasitic nematodes in the two locations when compared to carbofuran and the untreated control i.e. over the period of sampling. Cocoa bean yield after the first year of application showed that CPH+Carbofuran and CPH had the highest percentage of yield increase over the control (97.5% and 96.2%) respectively in Ibadan. In Owena, the yield for 2012 showed that CPH, CPH+NL(80:20), CPH+NL(90:10), CPH+Carbofuran, CPH+NL(80:20)+C, CPH+NL(90:10)+C  and Carbofuran alone had percentage increase of 88.8, 83.3, 79.2, 64.5, 61.7 and 28.6 respectively over the control. Organic materials had significant (p<0.05) effect in raising the soil pH and nutrient in the two locations from 5.38 to 6.82 in Owena and from 6.00 to 6.82, compared to untreated soil. Cost benefit analysis revealed the profitability to the costs of the treated plot over the control in both locations with CPH plot having the highest Average Rate of Returns. It is concluded that nematode management through the use of CPH and NL organic amendments in the rehabilitation technique not only reduced parasitic nematode populations below the damage threshold, and also improved soil nutrients, increased cocoa bean yield and income from the two plantations. Nematode management control option using CPH should be included in the rehabilitation methNo

 

November, 2016 Seminar Presentation

Tea Research in Nigeria: Achievements, Impacts and Future focus

R.R. Ipinmoroti, A.R Adedeji, S.O. Aroyeun, A.A. Oloyede, K.A Oluyole, M. A. Daniel B.A. Adebowale,, I. Ndagi, O.S.O. Akanbi, S.A. Adeosun, O.O. Olaniyi, A.T. Yahaya, and E. Agbebaku

 Abstract

Attempt was made to provide the background information on tea (Camellia sinensis L.)  research efforts at Cocoa Research Institute of Nigeria (CRIN) with the intention to highlight the technologies developed to date. Effort was geared towards showing the impacts of the research achievements on stakeholders, current research efforts and the future research focus towards sustainable tea production in Nigeria. Research efforts have resulted to initial introduction of 23 clone materials and another 70 China lowland tea clones, their characterization, genetic improvement for their adaptability and improvement for higher tea yield. Pests management, good agricultural practices and soil management techniques for sustainable tea production have been developed. New tea products for enhanced income and the dissemination of new innovations to appropriate stakeholders have been achieved. The use of identified commercial tea clones and the adoption of organic based fertilizers have enhanced better tea yield by more than 45%. Responsive chemical control for pests, adoption of good agricultural practices and the practice of Tea/Arable and Tea/Eucalyptus intercrops have helped to optimize the use of scarce land resources. Lowland tea cultivation has helped to increase land area under tea plantation, while adoption of cottage green tea processing has reduced tea leaf transportation cost and loss. Current research efforts center on encouraging educated youths into tea farming, discouraging blanket fertilizer application and encouraging organic fertilizer use. Efforts on shade crop effect on tea seedling establishment, identifying emerging insects/diseases and their control measures before reaching economic threshold Farmers are being sensitized through radio jingles to adopt developed technologies and encourage them to form cooperative groups for ease of accessing credit facilities. Future research efforts would focus on improving the genetic base of lowland tea clones for quality assurance, develop eco-specific fertilizers and establish model tea plots in lowland areas. Further value addition for increase tea consumption and to intensify the sensitization of farmers through radio programmes to encourage formation of tea farmers’ associations, produce manuals for farmers on tea cultivation and processing. There would be regular survey and updates on insects and diseases of tea across agro-ecologies.

 

Keywords: Challenges, farmers, optimal production, Survey, tea

 

 

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